customer

Why You Need To Help Your B2B Prospects

Why You Need To Help Your B2B Prospects

When you're in a business-to-business (B2B) company, you're not just selling to your users. Often, your users and your decision makers are completely different people. And not every user has the skills to manage up, even if they do really want to use your product or service. Here's why you need to help your B2B prospects get to yes—and a few ways to do it. >>

If you have a question, ask it

If you have a question, ask it

Do you really know what your customers are thinking every day? Probably not, even if you're in customer support. So if you're wondering why something you're doing isn't working, or why you're not getting the results you hoped for from an experiment or campaign, it might be time to ask. >>

7 Key Takeaways from #CTAConf

7 Key Takeaways from #CTAConf

I found out I was going to #CTAConf about 4 days before the conference began. So this conference wasn't any old conference. Instead, I learned everything about everything there is to know about marketing; shifted my focus to results, instead of "shallow, wide-eyed, on purpose, trifling-ass vanity metrics," and met a few new marketing geek friends. In short, it was awesome, and I learned a ton. Here's a few of my key takeaways >>

We Are All Human

We Are All Human

With the rise of machines automating our daily tasks--taking us to work, telling us the answers, or doing the dishes--it's hard for businesses to remember that we are all human.

Think about the last time you read about business. We love to say, "This company's very successful," or "This company revolutionizes X," when really, it's the people running those companies that make those changes. It's the marketer that builds a fantastic advertisement, not "Barbie." It's Elon Musk's crazy space ideas, not "Space X."

I'm guilty of this myself. Why we need to be more human >>>

When In Doubt, Test

When In Doubt, Test

When we ask questions, we expect those answers to tell us the problem. Even if we ask the right questions, people can introduce problems into the data. Behavior can reveal more than words. Rather than ask them what they think or feel, sometimes, we need to experiment to know what's important. 

This is part of a series of reflections inspired by my courses at HBX, an online business school cohort powered by Harvard Business School. With Business Analytics, Economics for Managers, and Financial Accounting, I'm learning the fundamentals of business. Find the whole series here.